pre ap classes

Pre-AP Classes

Pre-AP Classes

Taking pre-AP or AP classes can be a smart move for high school students. The classes challenge you academically and prepare you for college, but they also provide other benefits like better SAT scores, college credit, and the chance to get scholarships. However, some schools don’t offer these courses, so it’s important to check with your guidance counselor before signing up for any pre-ap classes.

pre ap classes

Do Pre-AP classes count as AP?

Pre-AP classes do not count as AP. There is no AP exam at the end of Pre-AP classes. Pre-AP classes are just advanced classes that some schools have. Pre-AP classes are black mapped from AP classes and The College Board has curriculums from Pre-AP classes which are designed to prepare you for real AP classes in that subject.  Pre-AP classes are intended for students who have not yet taken an advanced placement (AP) course or have taken one or two but do not plan to take further AP courses. They provide a bridge between the regular high school class and college-level courses. Students usually take Pre-AP classes in grades 9 and 10, but some elementary schools also offer Pre-AP classes to middle schoolers. Also, Pre-AP is not a curriculum. Even though great model lessons are provided, teachers can design their own instruction based on the course framework. The Pre-AP curriculum has been designed to prepare students for college-level work in five areas: English, mathematics, science, arts, and social sciences.

There are 12 Pre-AP classes that the College Board recognizes as actual Pre-AP classes. They are:

 

College preparation | Pre-AP Classes

Pre-AP classes are intended as an introduction to college-level classes, and they’re offered in a number of subjects. The courses are taught in a way that will help you learn how to study for college-level exams, but they’re not necessary for most high school students to graduate. Students can usually opt to take easier classes if they want to. However, top tier colleges and colleges in general love to see students challenging themselves and succeed in challenging classes because doing so shows that they are motivated to improve themselves, learn, that they can multi task, and that they are not afraid to work.

AP classes are a way to prepare for the rigors of college, which is why many high school students take them. These classes are typically offered at the high school level and can be taken as early as junior year. The teachers often have years of experience teaching AP classes and offer great tips on how to succeed in an AP class. Each AP exam costs about $100, but most colleges will give credit for your work if you pass with a three or better grade, so it’s definitely worth it! Also, some schools will pay your AP exam fee for you. Students who take AP exams may be eligible for free or reduced lunch programs and these students can talk to their counselor so that they can get their AP exam fee waived.

The great thing about taking an AP class is that you get more than just your average A+ grade — you’ll also be able to earn college credits toward graduation! In fact, I was able to graduate from my university three months early thanks entirely because I had taken plenty of these classes back in high school. Some states also offer grant programs that can help pay for tuition and fees at public colleges or universities.

Better SAT scores | Pre-AP Classes

Most of the mathematics and sciences covered in AP classes and Pre-AP classes aren’t taught until college, so if you’re familiar with the material already, you’ll have a leg up when it comes to the math and science sections of the SAT. If you’re thinking about taking AP classes in high school, here are some things to consider:

  • What do I want to do when I’m done with college? If you know exactly what kind of career goal you have and which field will help give you the skills necessary for that career, then it might make sense for you to take AP courses. This will allow more time for electives, which may give slightly less direct experience but can also be valuable. For example, if one wants to become a lawyer, then taking an AP American Government class would provide broader knowledge than an elective like “Introduction To Politics.” However, some people choose their major based on what they enjoy most; if that’s the case with your friend or family member, who knows? Maybe they’ll find success as a lawyer after all!

College credit | Pre-AP Classes

Pre-AP classes give you a taste of what AP classes can be like. Taking AP classes and doing well on AP exams are a good idea because many colleges and universities offer some sort of academic credit for high scores on AP tests —this could allow you to graduate college early and save money because you would be spending less money in college.

Some colleges and universities offer some sort of academic credit for high scores on AP tests—this could allow you to enter college as a sophomore or graduate early. Here are the most common scenarios:

  • College credit for taking the course (and passing). In this case, you’ll simply be able to skip your first semester or two of college classes since the material from your high school class will be covered in that first year of college anyway. You’ll receive credit for whatever courses you would have taken had you not skipped them, but at least now there’s no need for summer school!
  • College credit for taking and passing an AP exam. This is similar to getting a full semester’s worth of college credits—but it works out differently depending on which schools offer such programs (which usually have strict requirements). For example, many schools require students who earn certain scores on exams like Biology or Calculus BC (Biology C/Calc AB) to take additional coursework in order to fulfill prerequisites before being allowed into upper-level science classes.

Better chances at scholarships

If you’ve got plenty of AP credits, you’ve got less tuition to pay—and that means fewer student loans.

If you’ve got plenty of AP credits, you’ve got less tuition to pay—and that means fewer student loans. Colleges and scholarship programs often reward students who have challenged themselves academically and award more money to them than they would someone with a lower GPA. This makes sense: The more advanced the class, the more difficult it is for students to pass.

The bottom line? Taking rigorous classes in high school not only sets you up for success in college but also gives your GPA a boost, which could help earn you some extra cash for college or even give your applications an edge over others when applying for scholarships.

More choices

Colleges are looking for students who have challenged themselves academically. By taking Pre-AP classes and AP classes, you show that you’re serious about learning—and ready for more responsibility.

AP classes are a way to prepare for the rigors of college, which is why many high school students take them. Colleges are looking for students who have challenged themselves academically. By taking AP courses, you show that you’re serious about learning—and ready for more responsibility.

 

Other resources:

You can read about how many credits are AP classes.

You can read about if you can take AP classes over the summer.

You can read about are AP classes worth it.

You can read about what happens if you fail an AP class.

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